Three Powerful Mind Lessons the Sound of Music Teaches Us


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Most people, once they learn that I was born and grew up in Austria, feel the need to share with me how much they love  “The Sound Of Music.” Some even break out into The Hills Are Alive…”

Like most native Austrians I had never heard of this movie until moving to the U.S. After having lived here for almost 20 years the Sound of Music references can get a bit old. I know they probably will never end, so I decided to use them to my advantage and tell you the ChiefMind lessons that can be learned from it.

When the children were afraid of the thunderstorms Maria sang to them a song called “My Favorite Things.” By doing so she used three powerful techniques.

  1. Anchors – An anchor is a neurological association we make with things. sound of music mind lessonsEverything in life can be an anchor, but it doesn’t have to be. An anchor consists of two parts; a trigger and a response. When hearing a certain song, the song (trigger) will perhaps take you down memory lane and bring up a certain memory. That memory has a feeling attached to it. All of a sudden you start feeling those feelings (response.) Anchors can also be smells, tastes (like the taste of schnitzels), movies…
  2. Pattern Interrupt – It is useful to interrupt your own or someone else’s when stuck in an unresourceful state. Like getting caught in a negative spiral when things don’t turn out as we want. Or even when we are stuck in a rut. Or in the children’s case when afraid of a the weather. A pattern interrupt is a way to quickly change a person’s state.
  3. Imagination – By having the frightened children think of all of those favorite things she engaged their imagination. The subconscious mind doesn’t know the difference between reality and imagination. Once the children focused on the imagined things they started to feel better because the subconscious part of the mind -which is in charge of feelings and emotions- believed those favorite things to be real.

On a more personal note. Like any other self-respecting Austrian I prefer my schnitzels with potatoes instead of noodles.

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